Intensive Outpatient Program - Part 1


Substance abuse is a pervasive mental health problem that can affect anyone. Research has demonstrated that about one in ten Canadians reports having a substance use issue, and these individuals include professionals, those who are employed or self-employed and those who have other daily responsibilities and commitments such as homemakers and caregivers. At times, the substance abuse issue is problematic to the point that the individual needs to seek help from addiction counsellors and mental health professionals. Traditionally, when substance use is problematic, residential programming has been the conventional option for addiction treatment. However, taking an extended amount of time off could be a barrier in getting the help that is needed, especially for those who are employed or have daily commitments. It is for this reason that treatment providers also offer Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs). For those in need of addiction treatment, IOPs allow people to work and honour their daily commitments while also attending regular, outpatient treatment sessions in order to address their problems and to learn the tools that can help them maintain sobriety. Read more

Play It Forward for Mental Health Awareness

 

Henri Matisse said that creativity takes courage.  That's exactly how you would describe Shelley Marshall - courageous and creative.  Hilarious is another word you might use.  She's a comedienne, a mother and a mental health warrior.  And she's partnered with the Edgewood Health Network to bring her award winning autobiographical play Hold Mommy's Cigarette across Canada.

This one woman show is the story of Shelley's life and the impact a history of mental illness has on a family and a young girl.  It's a story that touches audiences deeply and makes them laugh just as hard. As Shelley says, “I take them on an adventure, both emotionally and visually. There is no denying that my story is tragic, but it’s my story and time and writing without shame has been my comedic relief. Hold Mommy’s Cigarette is not an exploitation of what has happened in my life, but rather, an acceptance of where it may lead. Read more

Mindfulness: From Distraction to Stillness

Stillness.  The calm surface of a lake at dawn.  The silence of an empty chapel.  The soft quiet of a night full of stars.  How we wish at times for our minds to settle, and just be still.  For the pointless worries to stop, that ceaseless chatter.  What we should have done, what we should be doing, what we should be preparing for.  The tyranny of the shoulds.  Our minds are constantly doing, always trying to fix things, change things, make things better.  Trying to close the gap between where we are, and where we think we should be.  From the second we get up in the morning, to the time we fall asleep at night.  What should I have said to her on the phone last weekend?  What can I do about my weight?  All big questions, to be sure, but do they never stop?   Read more

Healthy Relationships: Keeping it Positive

 

When it comes to discussing healthy relationships, many articles focus on “what not to do” in a relationship. Since Valentine's Day is a time when we celebrate the positive aspects of love, we decided to highlight “what to do” to keep the connection, and lightness alive in your relationship.

 

The couple that laughs together stays together

There is a time and a place for serious conversations, but if you can implement humour on a regular basis, this can be very therapeutic for you and your relationship. Watching a funny movie together or laughing together at a funny experience releases endorphins, which are the “feel good” chemicals in the brain. This creates happy moments that your brain can associate to your relationship. Inside jokes can increase bonding between you and your partner, because it implies that you share something fun and secretive, that no one else is privy to. Read more

Binge Eating Disorder Deserving of More Recognition and Treatment Options

Eating Disorder Awareness Week is February 1–7, 2015 and Bellwood Health Services is using this opportunity to raise awareness of Binge Eating Disorder - the most common but least talked about type of eating disorders.

When asked about eating disorders, most people immediately think of Anorexia Nervosa. Although anorexia is a very serious and sometimes life threatening eating disorder, years of movies, and magazine articles focusing on celebrities struggling with this issue, has given us the idea that it is also the most common of all eating disorders.  In fact, it is actually the least prevalent of the eating disorders.

Research has found that binge eating disorder affects 3.5% of women and 2% of men, with an average lifetime duration of 8.3 years (Hudson, Hiripi, Pope & Kessler, 2007).  This means that binge eating disorder affects more people than anorexia and bulimia combined, and can be life-long problem. Read more

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